Samphire colours soft muted winter morning Canning River

This image serves as a reminder for me to maintain a level of openness and awareness. It is only with awareness that we really see the world.

This winter’s morning the samphire colours are soft and muted. Gone are the grey-green colours they hold in high summer.

With clear winter nights, those chilly mornings are upon us again. Chilly in Perth is when it drops below about 5ºC! This time of year the samphire colours in the wetlands around the Canning River change colour from dull green-grey to a soft mauve or pink. See if you can spot the two little fellas out and about for an early and chilly breakfast.

Samphires around the Canning River wetland areas are mostly small plants below knee height. In the areas where there is a steady supply of water, they can grow to be bushy to about knee height. But most of the wetlands surface water dries out after winter. Then the soft, gooey clay bakes rock hard in the summer months. It’s a tough, salty, environment.

On this morning I was carrying in my pocket a small Canon digital camera. Doubtless, if I had my 4×5 by the time I  was set up the ducks would have moved, hence the expression ‘the best camera is the one you have at hand’.

What I really enjoy most is the soft muted samphire colours and tones in which the ducks remain almost camouflaged. The image is faithful to the quiet, stillness of a cold winter morning I experienced at daybreak.

Although the wetlands can appear drab grey and uninteresting, this image serves as a reminder for me to maintain a level of openness and awareness. It is only with awareness that we really see the world.

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alexbond
Since 1989, Alex Bond has published cards, calendars, books, and posters under his imprint Stormlight Publishing. His images showcase the West Australian environment. Bond's handcrafted, silver-gelatin, fibre-based prints are personally made by the author in his darkroom.

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