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IRIS AWARDS Semi Finalists Carlo Margaret River

IRIS Awards Carlo Margaret River Bronica 645 Kodak Tri-X. Back in 1987, I started a personal photographic project: photographing some of my family members and relatives around Margaret River. I didn’t set out with any particular plan such as a start and finish date, or a wish list of images, as perhaps you would for a commercial project. It simply took shape as I visited the region, usually several times per year. It depended solely on what opportunities presented themselves, at the time of those visits, for photography. Naturally, at some point during my visit I would ask if they would mind if I made some photographs whilst we talked. In some instances, there was only ever one photographic session, the confluence of opportunities and circumstances never re-emerging. Luckily in those situations I got what I thought was a pleasing image, so mission accomplished.

When I first photographed Carlo, above, he was already 83 years of age. I would often find him out in the paddocks, fossicking around for wood burls or looking for field mushrooms when in season.  Before his passing, at nearly 90 years of age, I had the pleasure of making several memorable images.

Most times I used my 4×5 field camera for the portraits, even leaving 4×5 Polaroid prints with my subjects after my visit, which was always a nice way to say thank you. Other times I used my 645 medium format camera, such as in the image above, which was easier to handle in rapidly changing circumstances. I used Kodak Tri X for both roll and sheet film, metering was all hand held, both film and prints hand processed by me.

I entered this image in the recent Perth Centre of Photography 2010 IRIS Awards, a national photographic portrait prize, some months back, and then actually forgot all about it. Unfortunately it didn’t make the judges’ selection for the final exhibition, but it did apparently make it through as one of about 30 semi-finalist images, according to a PCP flicker posting. How many of these made the final show I don’t know.

I only became aware of the above posting quite by accident, I certainly wasn’t contacted by PCP. Whilst on the subject of the Perth Centre of Photography, isn’t it time some of the digital savvy members amongst the PCP brought the website up to a professional standard? These days it’s not hard, difficult or expensive. The current PCP website has been under construction for far too long, which is farcical if they are a “centre of photography” running “national” awards.  Given that Perth Centre of Photography receives funding from WA’s Department  of Arts & Culture to run two national awards (IRIS and CLIP Awards), it would be nice to see an up to date and informative web site about the awards’ results, both past and present. It certainly would be a more inclusive way, for people outside of Perth of staying informed of the results, after all it’s meant to be a national award.

3 thoughts on “IRIS AWARDS Semi Finalists Carlo Margaret River

  1. I think this is a great photo Alex. I like how it is so natural and I feel that your grandfather had a wonderful bright and jovial personality, very welcoming.
    We have a settlers cottage here in Margaret River and our fire place looks similar being so large with the red brick with white grout, was this photo taken in a wooden settlers cottage?
    Great photos and i look forward to seeing more of you work.
    Benji
    The Margaret River Guide

    1. Thanks for your comments. My great uncle was a stonemason and helped build this house along with Carlo and his brothers, to replace an earlier 2 room wooden house that they had made. Prior to that they lived in tents for a long time. Carlo (who is not my grandfather) decided that the mortar between the bricks around the old kitchen stove need sprucing up, so he painted it white. Without his elder brother to argue with about his idea, I guess he got his way!

  2. Thank you Alex, my apologies for the mistake over your relation to Carlo. It sounds like Carlo did get his way with the fire. Amazing how hands on our predecessors were. Thank you for the background.

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