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Canning River Photos Silver Gelatin Print Exhibition

Dissociation Exhibition Opening Heathcote

Canning River Photos Silver Gelatin Print Exhibition

Heathcote Gallery Perth

“Dissociation” is an exhibition of Canning River Photos. It continues to document the contemporary landscape of one of Perth’s largest metropolitan regional parks and its relationship to the environment of Perth’s major water ways.

It is an attempt to resolve the conflict between the visual impact of land and river degradation while acknowledging the inherent beauty that persists within.

Dissociation photographic exhibition is an ongoing project documenting landscape elements within the Canning River environment. It  follows two smaller exhibits at the Riverton Library and the Canning River Eco Education Centre in 2013 and 2014.

Silver gelatin photographs are hand printed by the author in his traditional wet darkroom, from medium and large format black and white film negatives.

You can purchase all 28 images in the exhibition as a hardcover book.  To enquire about purchasing an original print, please email me.

 


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Artists Talk Dissociation Exhibition 2015

Dissociation Exhibition Opening Night

Artists Talk At Heathcote Museum & Gallery

Applecross

Saturday 14th March at 1pm.

I will be giving an artists talk show and tell discussing my use of a 4×5 field camera in making the images for this exhibition. All are welcome, come along with your questions, I will be bringing my 4×5 wooden field camera. During my presentation I will show you how I set up the camera to make a photograph, and what choices and decisions I might make in determining camera position.

PS the Sunday film processing workshop is booked out. I may get a chance to run a second, so leave your contact details with gallery staff ( heathcote@melville.wa.gov.au ) or contact me and we will let you know if a second date can be arranged.

artists talk Dissociation Exhibition Heathcote

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Canning River Dissociation Photographic Exhibition Heathcote Gallery

dissociation photographic exhibition

 

Canning River Dissociation Exhibition

You are invited to the opening

Heathcote Gallery & Museum, Applecross, Perth

March 7 to April 12, 2015

Opening night Friday, 6th March 6pm RSVP phone 9364 5666 or heathcote@melville.wa.gov.au

Canning River Dissociation is an exhibition of 30 hand printed black and white photographic prints made within the Canning River Regional Park, Perth.

The work explores the concept of beauty within a challenging and changing environment of a metropolitan regional park.

At the Gallery on Sat 14th March 1pm, I will give an artist talk discussing my use of film, large format cameras and traditional darkroom to create the silver gelatin prints in this exhibition.

The following day at 1pm at the Gallery, I will be giving a free workshop demonstrating film development. Places are limited so please contact the Gallery on: heathcote@melville.wa.gov.au or phone 9364 5666

Look forward to seeing you there.

 

 

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Photography Exhibition Canning River Eco Education Centre

Canning River Wetlands Perth Australia

Photography Exhibition Canning River is a personal photographic project I began taking my camera with me on my daily walks to record the wetland landscape between Greenfield Bridge and Kent St Weir and some of the uses people made of it.

Photographing the Canning River Regional Park was a natural extension of the landscape photography I have been making for publications since the late 80s. Most of that work has drawn me to remote locations, often national parks and reserves, where I would hike, camp and photograph.

The concept of national parks is sometimes a curious one. Parks and reserves are defined on maps with explicit boundaries indicated by blocks of colour or dotted lines. Of course in the natural world no such clear cut boundaries really exist, just regions of transition. However, those dotted lines hold power, shaping how we identify with the land and our perception of its value.  Images made within a national park boundary are more readily published than a similar landscape outside of that boundary.

Consequently, one landscape’s value can be held above another. This is not surprising as visiting national parks invokes positive associations of beauty, the exotic, freedom, relaxation and ‘getting back to nature’.

The landscape I am choosing to interpret does not involve the romance of travel, it is familiar not exotic, it is in my own back yard, within the city.

But choosing to value one landscape over another, and by implication the welfare of one above another, may be just as curious a notion as the neat lines drawn on a map. All land forms are interconnected and communicate through zones of transition with each other. The welfare and healthy state of one region affects its neighbouring regions, and so on. The whole is greater than the sum of its parts.

No where is this concept more apparent than the example of the Canning River flowing from a plateau down to an urbanised sand plain, meeting the Swan River, then out to sea. A river does not observe discrete boundaries or rights granted on a map, nor do birds or animals. Likewise a fence does not prevent weeds from spreading from one side to another, or define a clear ecological demarcation of species habitat, nor does it prevent water or air borne contaminants from one side entering another.

Much work in research, monitoring and rehabilitation has been conducted within the park by agencies and volunteers.  The resulting images started in 2011 have now emerged into a pictorial collection of the park land in its current state and use. I have chosen to embrace all of the park’s character, including both native species and the new invading species which have arrived since European settlement.  To this day I continue to make images of the parkland and river, as part of an ongoing project in documenting its state of change. 44 images have been published in the book: Lost in Suburbia, published by Stormlight Publishing, which was launched and exhibited at Riverton Library in 2013.

If you are in the Wilson – Kent Street area then please come to Photography Exhibition Canning River and have a look, afterwards you can enjoy a coffee next door at the cafe.

Canning River Eco Education Centre     Opening times and map

May 12 to June 5th, 2014

 

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Canning River photo Lost in Suburbia Exhibition Book

Canning River Photo
Oxygenation trail Canning River Perth

Exhibition & Book

18th November to 6th December 2013

Riverton Library

Canning River photo exhibition and book. To coincide with the release of my book “Lost in Suburbia” a selection of black and white images will be exhibited at Riverton Library, corner High and Riley Roads, Riverton.

The Canning River Regional Park is located 9 kilometres south east of central Perth, and is the largest regional park in the metropolitan area. This book is a visual record of the parkland’s recreational use and beauty. An ecologically and socially important parkland in a secluded little pocket off to one side of major urbanisation, a parkland hidden from general view, almost lost in suburbia.

The book can be ordered from Blurb.

The exhibition runs for 3 weeks. Anyone who lives near the Canning River or who has an interest in the urban environment or photography is invited to come along.

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Ansel Adams Exhibition Sydney

Ansel Adams Exhibition

Ansel Adams Exhibition “From the Mountains to the Sea” is currently showing at the Australian National Maritime Museum in Sydney. Alan Ross is in Sydney to open the exhibition. He is a former assistant to Ansel Adams and worked with him for 6 years. Alan Ross gave an interesting interview about the genesis of the exhibition on the ABC’s Weekend Arts with Sarah Kanowski. You can hear the full interview here on ABC Radio National web page. If you are that neck of the woods it would be well worth you dropping by. The last time I got up close to some Ansel Adams prints was in the bowels of the National Gallery in the early 90s.

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Changing Places Photographic Exhibition Silver Gelatin Prints Freo

Changing places exhibition alex bond peter kovacsy

Changing Places Photography Exhibition – a selection of silver gelatin prints by Alex Bond and Peter Kovascy. This afternoon Peter and I installed our exhibition ‘Changing Places’ into the Barracuda Studio Gallery in Pakenham St Fremantle.  Barracuda is open 10am to 5pm, Wednesday to Sunday. The exhibition runs for two weeks only, 17th March until 31st March, as part of the Foto Freo Festival. We are only a short walk from the cafe strip, so come down, catch our exhibition and enjoy a coffee. Don’t forget you are invited to our special evening viewing on March 24th from 6.30 to 8pm, where Peter and I will be available to discuss our work.

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Changing Places Photography Exhibition Fremantle

Changing Places Photography Exhibition

Changing Places Photography Exhibition at Barracuda Studio Gallery, Fremantle is only about a week away and final preparations are well underway.

This morning I fired up my old Seal Commercial press to dry mount my gelatin silver fibre based prints onto museum board ready for framing. If you haven’t received an invitation yet, then please consider this quick note as your invitation to drop by between the 17th and 31st March, Wednesday to Sunday 10am to 5pm, as  part of the FotoFreo 2012 Open Exhibition Programme. Or if you would like to catch up with Peter and myself  you can come along to a special evening viewing on March 24th. Look forward to seeing you there.

Changing Places Photography Exhibition


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Studio Gallery Yallingup

Studio Gallery Yallingup

The Studio Gallery Yallingup, has just opened this week with its official launch on Saturday  October 2nd, 2010, 6 to 8pm. If you would like to attend, RSVP to Lizzy – download the invite for details.

Amongst the artworks on display I was invited to exhibit several of my large format black and white prints as part of the gallery’s opening. The Studio Gallery is one of the region’s most modern purpose built galleries with a studio and an adjoining bistro. Located towards the Yallingup end of the Capes, it is well worth a visit if you are in the region.

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FotoFreo 2010

FotoFreo 2010 Fremantle Arts Centre

Having been away during its launch I finally got down and saw a little of the FotoFreo 2010 in its last days. The biggest joy for me was at the Fremantle Arts Centre with the photographs by Qin Wen of the demolition of old Chinese buildings under a wave of new western style high rise. They were big images, about 1m x 1.5m inkjet outputs (see above pic), probably from 4×5 format given their great detail. The compositions had a theatrical air about them. You could really stop and stare into these images, seeing the new buildings on the horizon all the way forward to peoples’ faces, tangled powerlines, jumbled tiled roofs right through to intricate foreground detail. The images were almost monochrome at the edges, with wonderfully soft, muted colours, except for the woman in traditional red dress who was the thematic link in all images. The soft muted colours of this exhibition were also shared by Eugene Richards’ “The Blue Room” at the Fremantle Prison Galleries. So refreshing to see subtle nuances being displayed again in colour photography, rather than the gawdiness often associated with a heavy handed photoshop technique. Also squeezed into the prison was Brad Rimmer’s exhibition “Silence – the West Australian Wheatbelt”, one of the few local, contemporary works supported within the main exhibition program by the FotoFreo organisers.